‘The Tempest’ comes to BGSU Firelands

The play has a cast of 24, including area high- schoolers, BGSU Firelands students, students from the main campus and some community performers.
Lori Demres
Apr 10, 2014
Have no fear of Shakespeare.

So says Cody Noon, who plays the king’s drunken butler, Stephano, in this weekend’s performance of “The Tempest” at BGSU Firelands. The performance starts tonight.

“I highly encourage you to find out what you’re missing,” Noon said. “It’s a lot of fun”

Want to go?
•WHAT: The Tempest
•WHEN: 7:30 p.m. tonight, Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
•WHERE: McBride Auditorium, BGSU Firelands 
•CALL: 419-433-5560 ext. 20747
•COST: $10 adults; $8 seniors, faculty and adult groups of 15 or more; $5 children 17 and younger; $4 BGSU
students

Shakespeare is generally categorized as comedy or tragedy, and “The Tempest” is one of his lesser-known comedies.

The BGSU Firelands rendition will feature the regular Shakespeare language, but it also has some blatant physical comedy.

Translation: There will be laughter, even if the language seems a tad complicated.

The play takes place on a remote island, where Prospero, a protagonist banished from his kingdom, plots to restore his daughter to her rightful place on the throne. With the help of some sorcery, Prospero conjures up a storm and maroons a sailing king. A comedic story of love, redemption and drinking ensues.

Director Grechen Lynne Wingerter can go on and on about the virtues of choosing “The Tempest” as the first full Shakespeare play ever done at the Firelands campus.

“I like it,” she said. “It has a lot of Shakespeare’s elements — magic, romance, danger — and it’s not too heavy. It’s a fun, lighter, more comedic play. The language and the plot line are less complicated than some of his works, and it adheres to time, place and action”

This is the first time Noon, a veteran actor of community theater, has performed in a Shakespeare play.

“Grechen needed extra guys, and I’ve never done Shakespeare so I thought it was time” he said.

Noon did some research on understanding the language of Shakespeare’s plays.

“It’s easy to memorize once you get the rhythm of it” he said.

The play has a cast of 24, including area high- schoolers, BGSU Firelands students, students from the main campus and some community performers.

Shakespeare wrote for the common man. So if the actors can come from all walks of life, then the audience can come from all walks of life to enjoy it.